Archives For Diocese of the Carolinas

bryanMT PLEASANT, SC – Monday May 23, 2016, clergy and lay delegates from the Diocese of the Carolinas voted unanimously to elect Bishop David C. Bryan as the first Suffragan Bishop of the Diocese of the Carolinas.

Bryan has served as Bishop of the Southeast (PEARUSA) Network since September 2013.This Network, one of three in PEARUSA, is part of a missionary district established by the Anglican Province of Rwanda in the United States.

This June, Archbishop Rwaje of Rwanda will formally hand over all three networks to Archbishop Foley Beach and the Anglican Church in North America. Two of the networks will become dioceses. The clergy and churches in Bishop Bryan’s network will have the opportunity to become part of an already existing Diocese of the Carolinas under Bishop Steve Wood.

“It’s the right thing for us to do here in the Carolinas,” Bryan said. “The clergy who elected me as their bishop agreed with me that we didn’t need another diocese. I am personally looking forward to working with Bishop Steve Wood and sharing episcopal ministry with him.”

The clergy and parishes in Bishop Bryan’s PEARUSA network will have until July 1 to apply for admittance into the Diocese of the Carolinas.

“I’m excited about the possibilities ahead,” Wood responded. “Bishop David and the clergy of his network are teaching all of us about humility and passion for gospel unity. The vote last night, I think, tells it all. Our clergy and lay delegates are excited about coming together.”

Archbishop Beach added, “Archbishop Rwaje and the House of Bishops of Rwanda want our Anglican witness of Jesus Christ in North America to be strong. I believe what Bishop David and the Southeast (PEARUSA) Network is doing demonstrates that witness boldly and courageously in the Carolinas.”

Related to the actions of the Southeast (PEARUSA) Network, Bishop Thad Barnum has accepted the position of Assisting Bishop in the Diocese of the Carolinas where Bishop Barnum has established an Office of Clergy Care attending to the personal and spiritual well-being of the clergy.

+Thad and his wife Erilynne have four grown children and eleven grandchildren. They reside in Pawleys Island, SC

+David and his wife Nancy have three grown children, with two married and one engaged. They reside in Columbia, SC.

+Steve and his wife Jacqui have four grown children and two grandchildren. They reside in Mt. Pleasant, SC.

If you have something to do with communications in your church, this might be for you. The workshop is for church staffs, pastors, church planters, and volunteers. The guest speaker is St. Andrew’s Communications Director, Greg Shore.

Zero Budget/Zero Time Church Communications

HOW TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN A WEB PRESENCE WHEN RESOURCES ARE LOW

During the morning session Greg Shore, Director of Communications for ACNA parish, St. Andrew’s ~ Mt. Pleasant, will look at social media – Facebook, Twitter and Instagram – and hear not only why we should be using it, but when and how.

We’ll reconvene after lunch to have David Childs, Director of Communications for Church of our Saviour, John Island, show us how to create a low-cost website using Wix as well as a brief foray into other current programming options.

There will be plenty of time for conversations, questions, and answers.

To register visit the Diocese of South Carolina’s website.

About Greg Shore

Greg-Shore_200-pxGreg’s job responsibilities started 18 years ago at St. Andrew’s ~ Mt. Pleasant with producing two service bulletins for three services and a weekly newsletter along with producing occasional advertising and collateral pieces. The job has grown and he now produces or oversees the production of all visual communications at St. Andrew’s and the Diocese of the Carolinas which includes weekly materials for 11 services in four locations, six websites, multiple social media outlets, video production, printed and online advertising, press relations, and live streaming operations for a weekly theology class and occasional worship service. He attends St. Andrew’s church plant in North Charleston where he serves as a LifeGroup Leader. In his spare time he bikes, runs, and coaches other runners. Greg lives in North Charleston with his three cats: Burley, Kowbeidu, and Woody.

Dear Family and Friends,

Surely you have watched with me through the night and into the day the violent and evil act committed at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston last night. And, I’m sure that your heart is rent for the families – and church family – of the victims. For some of you this will be one more disconnected and sad event played out on your television screens and internet. For many others it will be personal as it is your friends who are personally affected.

It is right that you feel sickened and angry. It is right that you struggle to know what to do. We all do. Scripture tells us that in the diminishment or suffering of one, the whole church suffers. We are enjoined to weep with those who weep and to mourn with those who mourn. Today, we mourn and we weep with our brothers and sisters at Mother Emanuel and all of Charleston.

I had the opportunity to speak with a number of African American church leaders and individuals and in particular Bishops Al Gadsden and William White, fellow ACNA bishops in the Reformed Episcopal Church. Their pain was palpable and multiplied as they must also to minister to an REC priest whose wife was killed in the shooting. In a separate heart-rending conversation, one elderly African American man told me he felt like the clock had been turned back 50 years. It is difficult for me to process the pain and sadness of those who have lost loved ones in such a violent manner.

Many priests, lay persons and friends from across the area and the country have contacted me wondering how to respond in a meaningful way. Some will have gathered at Morris Brown AME Church for the prayer vigil this afternoon. Others will be gathering at The Cathedral Church of St. Luke and St. Paul for prayer. We, St. Andrew’s and the Diocese of the Carolinas, will seek God’s face for wisdom and discernment as we seek to respond and act as agents of hope and reconciliation.

In these times one may ask, where is God? And the reply is, on the cross. For there he demonstrated once and for all his love for this sinful and broken world and he has promised us that he has not – nor will he – abandon His world.

Please join me in prayer as we remember

  • The families of those killed
  • The members of Mother Emanuel AME
  • The members of our law enforcement and first responders community
  • The members of the Charleston community

And pray that

  • That there would be no further acts of violence
  • There would be peace in our city
  • That unity may overcome estrangement
  • That joy might conquer despair

Lastly, I commend the following prayer to you and to our congregations across the Diocese of the Carolinas. Bishop Mark Lawrence of the Diocese of South Carolina has sent the same prayer to the Diocese of South Carolina. Let us, in brotherly affection join our voices as we pray:

“O God, you have made of one blood all the peoples and races of the earth, and sent your blessed Son to preach peace to those who are far off and those who are near: Grant to those who have lost love ones your hope, comfort and peace; grant to those members of Emmanuel AME Church a sense of your presence; look with compassion on the whole human family here in Charleston and across our nation; show us how to respond to one another’s hurt and suffering; shed abroad your Spirit on those who have lost faith, hope and trust in You and one another; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that in your good time all peoples and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.”

Yours in Christ,

+Steve

A Conversation on Race

and Mission Among African Americans

April 27-28, 2015

 

A Collect for the Human Family: O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Ephesians 2:19-22 So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure, being joined together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord. In him you also are being built together into a dwelling place for God by the Spirit.

Revelation 7:9-10 I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice,“Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!”

 

raceandmissionFrom Ferguson to North Charleston to Baltimore

In November of this past year, the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri became a further catalyst for our ongoing conversations about race across the United States and within the Anglican Church in North America. In response, Archbishop Foley Beach called together leaders from around the Church to discuss issues of race, systemic injustice, and our mission to reach all of North America with the transforming love of Jesus Christ. We recognize that this must include a deeper level of engagement with and among our African American communities.

In January, Bishop Alphonza Gadsden of the predominantly African-American Diocese of the Southeast (REC), graciously offered to host this dialogue at one of his parishes, New Bethel Reformed Episcopal Church (ACNA) in North Charleston, South Carolina.

At that time, we never could have anticipated the way North Charleston would become a part of the national conversation, nor could we have known that the unrest in Baltimore would unfold during the days of our gathering. The leaders of one of our newest church plants, Church of the Apostles in the City, Baltimore, MD were with us for this dialogue. Throughout the day their cell phones rang with first hand accounts from family members who were the victims of this violence. These are real people in our parishes, and we grieve together.

We had the opportunity to join them in prayer, interceding for the safety of the police officers, the citizens of Baltimore, and the perpetrators of violence. We have been encouraged by the witness of Baltimore’s clergy who took to the streets in an effort to end the violence that was destroying their communities.

There are no easy answers to the issues that plague our communities, but the spirit of unity that was in our midst this week testifies to the hope that we have through the cross of Christ, which reconciles us to God and one another.

Towards A More Diverse and Unified Future

We began with a frank assessment of the current challenges facing the Anglican Church in North America in our mission with and among African Americans. The Book of Revelation gives us the multiethnic vision of the Church in which members of every nation, tribe, people, and language offer up their unified praise before the Lamb (Rev. 7:9-10).

This biblical vision leads us to affirm a deeper commitment to both multiethnic and ethnic-specific expressions of the Church; a change that is critical if we are to remain in step with the Holy Spirit in light of the shifting demographics of North America.

Multiethnic ministry continues to expand within our Church. This emphasis includes Bishop Leung of Vancouver whose pioneering work in Asian and Multicultural Ministries in Canada (AMMiC) has now spread to the United States. Caminemos Juntos is a vibrant network of members committed to the growth of Hispanic congregations in North America. This week we have taken the first steps in addressing as a Province, the need for the intentional inclusion and growth of the African American community in our midst.

The Challenge Today

Few conversations are as timely and important to our life as a Province, and so while our hearts have been grappling with the tragedy of the present, our eyes are looking to the future.

To this end we:

  1. Ask each congregation to pray and work for racial reconciliation in their community,
  1. Intend to develop a Provincial team to lead our multiethnic ministries and we encourage the development of regional networks to support those who are called to multiethnic church planting, evangelism, and discipleship,
  1. Invite dioceses and parishes to consider how they might actively develop more effective multiethnic leadership pipelines,
  1. Invite dioceses and parishes to make a financial commitment to supporting multiethnic leadership.

Talk alone will not bridge the gap or bind us together, but if we are to move forward, action must be preceded by honest dialogue. Talk is not cheap. Risking these conversations in our present culture is costly. We invite all who love the Lord Jesus Christ to join us in moving the conversations in our communities forward, so that together, having cleared a foundation, we can build a common future that brings glory to God.

 

A Collect for Peace (prayed during the violence that unfolded in Baltimore, Monday, April 27, 2015) O God, the source of all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works: Give to your servants that peace which the world cannot give, that our hearts may be set to obey your commandments, and that we, being defended from the fear of our enemies, may pass our time in rest and quietness, through the merits of Jesus Christ our Savior. Amen.

A Collect for Mission (prayed during Morning Prayer, Tuesday, April 28, 2015) O God, you have made of one blood all the peoples of the earth, and sent your blessed Son to preach peace to those who are far off and to those who are near: Grant that people everywhere may seek after you and find you; bring the nations into your fold; pour out your Spirit upon all flesh; and hasten the coming of your kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

 

The Most Rev. Dr. Foley Beach
Archbishop and Primate

The Rt. Rev. Alphonza Gadsden
Bishop, Diocese of the Southeast (REC)

Rev. Jay Baylor
Church of the Apostles in the City, Baltimore, MD

The Rev. Taylor Bodoh
Incarnation Tallahassee, FL

Mrs. Linda G. Butler
Grace Reformed Moncks Corner, SC

Mr. Ron Davis,
All Saints, Woodbridge, VA

Mrs. Rose-Marie Edwards-Tasker
Intercessor, Anglican Church in North America

Mr. Kevin Gadsden
New Israel Reformed Episcopal Church, Charleston, SC

The Rev. Canon Andrew Gross
Canon for Communications and Media Relations

The Rt. Rev. John Guernsey
Bishop, Diocese of the Mid-Atlantic
Dean of Provincial Affairs

The Rev. David Hanke
Restoration Anglican Church, Arlington, VA

The Rev. Christopher Jones
Incarnation Tallahassee, FL

The Rt. Rev. Mark Lawrence
Bishop, Diocese of South Carolina

Mr. Peter Lebhar
InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, Tallahassee, FL

The Ven. Canon Dr. Jack Lumanog
Archbishop’s Canon & COO

The Rev. Esau McCaulley
PhD Candidate, St. Andrew’s University, Scotland

Mr. Drew Miller,
St. Andrew’s City Church, Charleston, SC

The Rt. Rev. William White
Bishop, Diocese of the Southeast (REC)

The Rt. Rev. Steve Wood
Bishop, Diocese of the Carolinas

Ms. Carletta Wright
Church of the Apostles in the City, Baltimore, MD

Excellent article from Anglican Mainstream:

In contrast (to the CofE), what the Anglican Church in North America is doing, and what GAFCON is doing,  is centripetal. Not flinging things outwards.  But drawing things in to the centre. Like dust being drawn up into a tornado.

But what is that centre? Is it a particular person’s version of the faith? Is it the personality of one Archbishop? Is it the the narrow agenda of a particular group of Archbishops, as many in the liberal media would want to portray it ?

No. What is at the centre is the Bible: the Bible as authoritative for all faith and conduct; the Bible as its own interpreter, rather than being read through the spectacles of super elevated human reason and contemporary secular culture.

In addition,  the Anglican 39 Articles of religion are being reasserted as being at the centre:  it is those Articles that makes us specifically Anglican Christians rather than Baptist or Pentecostal or Presbyterian Christians.

The Bible and the 39 Articles of Religion (and the Anglican liturgy based upon the Book of Common Prayer) is what unites us as Anglicans. And so if we want to be Anglican, and properly Anglican, and recover Anglicanism, we need to get back to that centre.

And like the spokes on a bicycle wheel come closer to one another, the closer they get to the hub, so Anglicans are drawn closer to each other, the closer we come back to the historic core of our faith.

Read the rest.

AshleyNullA few weeks ago we (St. Andrew’s and the Diocese of the Carolinas) had the pleasure of hosting The Rev’d Dr Ashley Null, the theological advisor to the Diocese of the Carolinas, for two-days of teaching and ministry.  As a part of his time with us Ashley sat down with The Rev’d Claudia Dickson Greggs for a little chat about his life and work.  Claudia writes occasional papers for the Diocese entitled,Perspectives, in which she highlights some of the various people and ministries associated with the Diocese of the Carolinas.  Following is a snip of her article, the full article is linked below.

Grace and gratitude play a central role in The Rev’d Dr. Ashley Null’s life and work. Ashley is an authority on the English Reformation – particularly the theology of Thomas Cranmer, who was the author of the first Book of Common Prayer and the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of King Henry VIII and Edward VI.   Ashley also serves as a senior research fellow for The Ridley Institute and a theological consultant to the Diocese of the Carolinas, most recently giving a series of thought-provoking lectures to the clergy of the diocese. In those lectures, Ashley talked about how Cranmer’s understanding of God’s grace and mercy shaped the Communion service he composed for the first English Prayer Books (or the 1552 Book of Common Prayer).

A similar understanding – of how God’s grace, freely offered in love, sets the stage for us to acknowledge our sinfulness and repent – has shaped Ashley’s life. Although born in Birmingham, Alabama, (‘Ashley’ is a family name) he was reared in Salina, Kansas, and since his father was an Episcopalian, the Null family attended Christ Episcopal Cathedral, where the bishop of the Diocese of Western Kansas was in residence. His mother had been raised in the Baptist church (her great-great-grandfather was the first Secretary of the Southern Baptist Foreign Missions Board) but with Pentecostal influences– and all of these Christian traditions – Anglican, Evangelical and Pentecostal – played an important role in Ashley’s formation as a Christian. The Book of Common Prayer, with its liturgies and prayers rooted in Scripture, held a special appeal for him.

Read the rest.

Just back from parish visits to St. Barnabas and All Saints in Charlotte followed by meetings with Bishop Steve Breedlove and his leadership team heading up the Simeon Fellowship so I missed posting this great article.  Such good news.

 — The church near the corner of Peace and Blount streets looks as though it could have been there for centuries, with its peaked roof and mottled brick walls – except for the insulating wrap that still sheaths half its exterior. 

It’s the first new church building to be built in downtown Raleigh for half a century.

“We wanted to build a transcendent space,” said the Rev. John Yates III, his breath hanging beneath the arching steel bones of the sanctuary. To his left, a construction worker rode an accordion lift to finish the details of a window that reached toward the 60-foot ceiling.

Ashley-Null

Five Sessions. Five SOLAS (SOLA = alone. Christ Alone. Grace Alone. Faith Alone. Scripture Alone. God’s Glory Alone!) with world renowned Cranmer scholar Ashley Null. Guess what? It’s free. Guess what? You’re invited. If you can’t come watch it online by grace alone (that means its free)

Thursday, February 19

  • 6:00 – 7:00  pm  Session 1
  • 7:00-7:15 pm  Break
  • 7:15 – 8:15 pm  Session 2

Friday, February 20

  • 9:00 – 10:00 am Session 3
  • 10:00-10:15 am  Break
  • 10:15-11:15 am Session 4
  • 11:15-11:20 am Break
  • 11:20 – 12:20 am Session 5

 

Click here for livstream.

Ashley Null lecturing at The Ridley Institute

Ashley Null lecturing at The Ridley Institute

  • Lecturer: Dr. Ashley Null
  • Thursday evening, February 19 and Friday, February 20
  • Free

The Anglican Diocese of the Carolinas will host Dr. Ashley Null for a two-day teaching on The Five Solas (Sola = alone. Christ Alone. Grace Alone. Faith Alone.  Scripture Alone. God’s Glory Alone) at St. Andrew’s Church. This event is free and open to all.

Ashley Null, both the Theological Advisor for the Diocese of the Carolinas and the Senior Research Fellow for the Ridley Institute, will deliver five lectures.  The lectures will also be available via livestream for those who cannot attend in person at TheRidleyInstitute.com.

Lecture Schedule

Thursday, February 19

  • 6:00 – 7:00  pm Session 1
  • 7:00-7:15 pm Break
  • 7:15 – 8:15 pm Session 2

Friday, February 20

  • 9:00 – 10:00 am Session 3
  • 10:00-10:15 am  Break
  • 10:15-11:15 am Session 4
  • 11:15-11:20 am Break
  • 11:20 – 12:20 am Session 5